How To Personalize and Obituary

By: Louis Bruno
Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Writing and delivering an obituary is a monumentous task and should not be taken lightly. Covering a loved ones successes and highlights spanning a lifetime while maintaining brevity is quite a feat to accomplish. While important, obituaries don't have to be overly difficult or complicated. Many, in fact, follow the same basic theme, which includes certian information that should be given along with other areas that involve a little more artistic freedom.

Keeping an obituary unique while also maintaining the proper tone is accomplished with a little forethought and following a few basic guidelines. We aim to help you along this process with our items and general template that we think should be kept in consideration. Likewise, we also offer a few tips and tricks when it comes to giving a unique and heartfelt obituary.


Basic Information to Cover

The following items are included in all obituaries. There is room for a more personal touch further along, but this first section doesn't leave much wiggle room. Here you should cover:


2.Place of Birth and Death

3.Date of Birth and Death

4.Information regarding Memorials or pertinent to donations

5.Their immediate family and loved ones

6.Information regarding Funeral Service time, location, and date


Personal Touches

This is where you get to show off your artistic talents, while highligting the strength and positive characteristics of your loved one. We have some topics for you to consider to help you come up with more ideas of your own:


Life Highlights

If at all in doubt, showcase your loved one's highlight reel. If they made any positive changes or were especially proud of certain accomplishments these can absolutely be included. Positive experiences and life-changing trips abroad at any point in their lives are a couple of examples when it comes to showing just how unique and engaging your loved one was.



Pointing out positive personality traits and focusing on these is a perfect way to memorialize your loved one when writing an obituary. Speaking to their character and how they made your life better are popular choices, as is mentioning just how much people liked them. If they were active members of the community or had any particular hobby that's worth noting, this is the time to add it in.


Favourite Stories

While these can be covered in the previous points, pointing to particular stories is a perfect way to personalize an obituary. Tales of heroism and bravery or good times and laughter all have their merits. Pick something that your loved one enjoyed. Stories that they loved to tell are easy picking here. Anecdotes and jokes are also welcome as long as they are appropriate and fit the mood.


Whatever route you choose, we hope that this guide has helped you come up with some great ideas for your obituary. Funerals are an emotional time and we know that keeping up with everything that needs to be done can be a big task. With that in mind, feel free to contact Charles J. O'shea at any point, especially if you have any questions or concerns regarding any aspect of the funeral process.

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